Elizabeth seemed happy; my tranquil demeanour contributed greatly to calm her mind. But on the day that was to [fulfill] <fulfil> my wishes and my destiny, she was melancholy, and a presentiment of evil pervaded her; and perhaps also she thought of the dreadful [secret, which] <secret which> I had promised to reveal to her [on] the following day. My father was in the mean time overjoyed, and, in the bustle of preparation, only [observed] <recognised> in the melancholy of his niece the diffidence of a bride.

After the ceremony was performed, a large party assembled at my father's; but it was agreed that Elizabeth and I should [pass the afternoon and night at Evian, and return to Cologny the next morning. As the day was fair, and the wind favourable, we resolved to go by water.] <commence our journey by water, sleeping that night at Evian, and continuing our voyage on the following day. the day was fair, the wind favourable, all smiled on our nuptial embarkation.>

Those were the last moments of my life during which I enjoyed the feeling of happiness. We passed rapidly along: the sun was hot, but we were sheltered from its rays by a kind of canopy, while we enjoyed the beauty of the scene, sometimes on one side of the lake, where we saw Mont Salêve, the pleasant banks of [Montalêgre] <Montalègre>, and at a distance, surmounting all, the beautiful Mont [Blânc] <Blanc>, and the assemblage of snowy mountains that in vain endeavour to emulate her; sometimes coasting the opposite banks, we saw the mighty Jura opposing its dark side to the ambition that would quit its native country, and an almost insurmountable barrier to the invader who should wish to enslave it.

I took the hand of Elizabeth: "You are sorrowful, my love. Ah! if you knew what I have suffered, and what I may yet endure, you would endeavour to let me taste the [quiet, and] <quiet and> freedom from despair, that this one day at least permits me to enjoy."