"She [indeed requires] <most of all," said Ernest, "requires> consolation; {MS consolation," replied Ernest--She} she accused herself of having caused the death of my brother, and that made her very wretched. But since the murderer has been discovered--"

"The murderer discovered! Good God! how can that be? who could attempt to pursue him? it is impossible; one might as well try to overtake the winds, or confine a mountain-stream with a straw. <I saw him too; he was free last night!>"

"I do not know what you [mean; but we were all very unhappy when she was discovered] <mean," replied my brother, in accents of wonder, "but to us the discovery we have made completes our misery.>. No one would believe it at first; and even now Elizabeth will not be convinced, notwithstanding all the evidence. Indeed, who would credit that Justine Moritz, who was so amiable, and fond of all the family, could [all at once become so extremely wicked] <suddenly become capable of so frightful, so appalling a crime>?"

"Justine Moritz! Poor, poor girl, is she the accused? But it is wrongfully; every one knows that; no one believes it, surely, Ernest?"

"No one did at first; but several circumstances came out, that have almost forced conviction upon us: and her own behaviour has been so confused, as to add to the evidence of facts a weight that, I fear, leaves no hope for doubt. But she will be tried to-day, and you will then hear all."

He related that, the morning on which the murder of poor William had been discovered, Justine had been taken ill, and confined to her bed; [and, after several days,] <for several days. During this interval,> one of the servants, happening to examine the apparel she had worn on the night of the murder, had discovered in her pocket the picture of my mother, which had been judged to be the temptation of the murderer. The servant instantly [shewed] <showed> it to one of the others, who, without saying a word to any of the family, went to a magistrate; and, upon their deposition, Justine was apprehended. On being charged with the fact, the poor girl confirmed the suspicion in a great measure by her extreme confusion of manner.